I wanted to start by saying thank you to ADHDManagement.com for their commitment to our community of ADHDers.

My adult life as an ADHDer has been made easier by incorporating a combination of specific apps into my personal multi-pronged ADHD management approach.

My overall goal is to further the ADHD community as a whole, so I have handpicked 6 apps that focus on a specific problem or hurdle that we face as ADHDers.

*ADHDApps Tip: Don’t overload yourself right away with all these apps. Just like with all things ADHD, you must strike your proper balance.

  1. Remembering: Evernote
    App link | Web link
    The motto for Evernote is “Remember Everything.” And while that might be a stretch, the awesome (in the literal definition) ability of this app will allow you to remember and organize all your thoughts and ideas, really all aspects of your life. Evernote is so popular that you have probably seen ads for it, or you know someone who uses it. I use it everyday, in many different ways; The sky is the limit with this very innovative app and your ADHD.
  2. Managing Daily Tasks: HomeRoutines
    App link | Web link
    HomeRoutines is the ultimate To Do List/Timer/Scheduler/Reminder/so much more/ that I can’t even go in to it! Made by a great indie couple from NZ, this app is the foundation of my entire day and week. Using this app, I personally have been able to change the way I  get through every day of my life. There is a whole online community dedicated to this app, so get inspired by this one!
    *ADHDApps Tip: If you need a bump of encouragement, click on the “Accomplishments” button to display every To Do you have accomplished.
  3. Planning: MindNode
    App link | Web link
    MindNode really lets you get into a project and tap into your ADHD instead of just letting it get in the way. I am a big picture person and, to that end, MindNode is truly a powerful tool to outline projects and then start to fill in the details. I just wrote this blogpost in MindNode!
  4. Understanding Ourselves: Momento
    App link | Web link
    This journaling app not only allows you to document your daily life, allowing for tracking mood, taking pictures, and like 12 other things, but Momento also pulls feeds from your Facebook, Twitter, etc., and gives you the overall picture.
    *ADHDApps Tip: Take pictures of your meds directly before you take them, and you will have an automatic medical record that is much more accurate then your memory.
  5. Nutrition/Exercise: Calorie Count
    App link | Web link
    I love Calorie Count because it allows me to track my water intake, my food intake and any exercise (even playing around with the kids!)  For ADHDers exercise and nutrition are extremely important, and this gives you a solid way to track your day to day. *This app is almost identical to MyFitnessPal so if you use MFP, keep using it!
    *ADHDApps Tip: Don’t let yourself get too discouraged if you miss a few days or even a week. Focus on consistency, but don’t let your brain throw this effort in the trash. Just keep pluckin’, we are good at that!
  6. Anti-Overwhelm: Koi Pond
    App link | Web link
    This is my anti-overwhelm app and exactly what it sounds like: a pond in which you control the ripples and fish with your fingers. You will get lost in it, and just calm down with a breathing exercise or two. I personally love Koi Pond because it allows me to relax in any situation where there is a lot of distraction or when I need an ADHD “timeout”.
    *ADHDApps Tip: When anxious, grab headphones and a corner; turn this app on and just focus on the water.

Have a wonderful day!


Mark Kawate About Mark Kawate

Mark Kawate is a Business Developer with ADHD and the Founder of ADHDapps.me and @ADHDApps. Mark also works to build and promote multi-pronged approaches that take advantage of his ADHD, with the goal of furthering the quality of every ADHD life.

Comments

  1. I would absolutely add The Fabulous to this list. This is just for Android, but it’s really helping me to sustain healthy habits. Can’t recommand it enough.

    it’s based on Tiny Habits by BJ Ford.

    Here’s the link : https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=co.thefabulous.app&hl=en

  2. For Android – I wouldn’t ever remember to take any meds without MedHelper. It not only reminds you to take your meds but it can track your inventory, remind you to refill meds, track vitals, appointments…etc. there is so much that this does to keep you straight with your meds all in one place. It also allows you to have different profiles so you can keep track of kids or spouse’s info too. Plus its free!

    I can’t recommend it enough!

  3. Do you have an recommendations for an academic calendar? Hands on… Not phone related. I do best with looking at the entire month at one glance! Thanks

  4. Has anyone else ever considered that the smartphone could be the worse thing ever invented for someone identified with ADHD?

    Looking forward to your thoughts!
    Mark Julian

    • The smartphone is like every other thing we must learn to balance. If we pay attention to the ways that the phone can keep us on track (such as setting timers) it is helpful. If we choose to pay attention to the way we are able to get lost in the apps and the other distractions maybe we need to ask ourselves how that is serving us? I realized that I was distracting myself with an app and I was upset that I allowed myself to be so unproductive. However, I learned with the help of my attention coach that it was serving me in ways I hadn’t even noticed. I would get on the app and realized that I wasn’t paying attention to the game or wasting time! What I was doing was using that time to keep myself focused on the heavy issues that where on my mind. I was relaxing and planning in a way that worked for me at the time.

    • Here’s my own solution : no data plan. This way, I won’t be tempted to use my Internet. In case you can’t do this, delete facebook and twitter. Only leave the messenger app.

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  6. I would add Awesome Note to this list. It’s basically like a digital binder/notebook with Calendars, Tasks and a Tagging System. For me, it’s a great all-in-one. I like the interface much better than the Evernote iphone App and having the Calendars and Tasks in the same place is CRUCIAL. Also very useful for keeping a diary.
    Before this, I would over-organize my schedule and get distracted with the details using other programs, then eventually forsake them. This is the only one that I’ve been able to stick to. There’s not an online/cloud app, BUT it integrates beautifully with Evernote so it’s always backed-up and I can edit notes anywhere. I go back and forth between the 2 as if they are the same app.
    Awesome Note “Free” is actually more of a trial – you can only make 10 notes. It is enough to get a feel for it. I knew immediately that it was what I was looking for. The full version is $2.99 and I’d say it’s worth it. I’m pretty sure it’s the only app I’ve paid for, and that says a lot.

    TIP: I use a laminated half sheet of paper as a mini-white board that fits into a small zip-up binder. I can brainstorm and stuff, then I just take a picture of it in Awesome Note. Not sure if Awesome Note has this ability, but images with words are searchable with Evernote, which is amazing.

  7. I realize that this post is a bit old (especially in iphone app world), but I am curious if anyone knows anything about these apps and has any tips on what to be aware of (please post any positives, negatives, or knowledge you may have – including any info on which apps may serve all the same purposes, but why you preferred one over the other.) My hesitation with apps is that I worry about taking too much time to set them up and finding after that I was unaware of it not being useful for my particular purposes, so any and all details are helpful!

    Some of these are for organization/time management, while some are for going back and forth between reading/audio (for driving/efficiency purposes), and some are for help with dictation since I have carpal tunnel/tendonitis which gets increasingly worse as my school year progresses. I like apps that work with everything or are transferable to everything, that have varieties of reminders/alarms, and easy to follow/easy to read if they are calendars or productivity apps, allow highlighting if reading (or give audio of only highlighted sections), and that can vary between dictation and typing. I currently do not use any computer products other than my iphone (and on rare occasion, my very old ipod nano).

    Here are the ones that I am either looking at, or have already downloaded (but either have not used, or only begun to use), and all I have downloaded are the free version but am willing to pay if it makes a different in how great an app can be:
    1. Speaktoit Assistant (this one sounds awesome, but it’s privacy policy concerns me) – Speaktoit LLC
    2. Voice Dream – Voice Dream LLC
    3. CalenMob
    4. Alarmed
    5. Schedule Planner- Intersog
    6. iNotes Assistant – Quanticapps
    7. Debt Payoff Assistant – SVT Software
    8. Interview Assistant – Intersog
    9. Leave Now – Tetherpad
    10. Intuition + : Mom’s Peronal Assistant – IconApps, Inc.
    11. TTS Alarm – FMPROJECT
    12. Dragon Dictation
    13. SpeakText for Me – BorG Technology Corp
    14. SuperNote
    15. AudioMemos
    16. Any.Do To-Do List – Any.Do
    17. inClass
    18. iTab
    19. Note’d
    20. OneNote (I have not used this on my laptop, but I have been wanting to try it – another task I find daunting, so feel free to comment on the Microsoft Office program on computers as well.)
    21. Office Lite (Microsoft Office again, but haven’t used it.
    22.Audible
    23. Reminder free
    24. Organizer To-Do: The Complete Planner – Yadahome.com LLC
    25. BillTracker

    I appreciate any help anyone is willing to give – the more detail of what you do and do not like about an app is most helpful – thanks!

  8. If you don’t have an iphone, there is a good online timer I use at timerbutton.com

  9. I am an adult with ADHD and even with medication, I often get overwhelmed by the details. I tried every to-do and time management program out there, but none of them really helped. I’d get hyperfocused and spend all day on updating lists and re-prioritizing things.

    They say necessity is the mother of invention, so I developed an algorithmic formula to not just create a to-do list, but which automatically updates it for you throughout the day (including those to-do’s with future due dates) based on the priority of the task.

    Before I develop this as an app, I’d love to get some feedback on whether others with ADHD would benefit from a to-do list that automatically prioritizes / updates your tasks.

    Thank you!

    Glenn

    • @Glenn…I just came across your post/request for a response on the type of app your considering developing and wanted to let you know that I’d absolutely love to have an app that automatically updates and prioritizes. I need consistent reminders of upcoming due dates for both my personal and career life and find that as I get older, it’s more difficult to organize and prioritize things tasks and projects.
      Please keep us updated on your progress with this app. I’d love to see the results!

    • Just found your comment about developing an APP. Coincidentally, I just recently came up with a very similar concept, and would consider collaborating with you. However, I am NOT a programmer, but a creative sales/marketing type, with a techie/ADHD vision.

      Please reply to me if you are interested in discussion this further.

    • Jenny Jones says:

      I’ve also been working on my own app because none I’ve found exactly meet my needs. I’m a mini-programmer (a data & sql “expert” with some ability to fiddle around with python, Java & .net), but my forte is really in analysis & usability. A collaboration between a for-real programmer, a marketing guy and an analyst sounds pretty much like the trifecta for something like this!

    • Hi Glenn,
      I am interested in your research with your algorithm.
      Did this app get released?

  10. Michael says:

    Due. I bought an iphone for this app.

  11. Yes! I swear by Evernote. It’s one of those “how did I live before this?” tools that you don’t know you need until you have it. I literally use it every day. Try it out, smart phone users!

  12. “This might seem like I am over complicating my life, but I have found that when each app serves a single purpose, it works alot better for me.”

    I definitely understand where your coming from, it helps getting a specific task done by having separate apps for separate purposes. It is almost like a new “focal” environment helps us to zero in on each task and dampens the quick onset of boredom when you are making yourself focus.

    The most important thing of any system is that it works for you! The system only looks overwhelming because you are writing out every single app you use, but you didn’t start using them all at once. Point being that you built this system around your individual brain function, and that is exactly what ADHDers who want to take advantage of these centralized devices need to do! One step at a time and all that. Thank you Tom!

  13. Just to follow on from my previous comment; a great app for remembering medications is called Pillboxie. I have not used it but it is beautifully designed and was designed and developed by a registered nurse.

    http://www.pillboxie.com/

  14. I use alot of different apps, each for a particular area of my life. This is because using one app for many purposes causes me to become overwhelmed.

    The apps I currently use are:

    Daily Routine & Future Tasks: Things – http://culturedcode.com/things/iphone/
    Bills: Bills on your table – http://www.billsonyourtable.com/
    Shopping List: Slide To Buy – http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/slide-to-buy-grocery-shopping/id465684775?mt=8
    Inventory: Teux Deux – http://teuxdeux.com/
    Positivity: Gratitude Journal – http://happytapper.com/gratitude-journal
    Feelings: DayOne – http://dayoneapp.com/
    Project Management: Wunderkit – http://get.wunderkit.com/
    Misc Tasks: Wunderlist – http://www.wunderlist.com/
    CRM: Highrise – http://highrisehq.com/
    Geolocation: Pin Drop – http://pindropapp.com/
    Dictionary: Definition – http://definitionapp.com/

    This might seem like I am over complicating my life, but I have found that when each app serves a single purpose, it works alot better for me. There are still times when I make mistakes but since I have done things this way, my life has become easier.

    Tom

  15. Brett,

    Evernote for Android is here: https://market.android.com/details?id=com.evernote

    Calorie Counter for Android is here: https://market.android.com/details?id=com.about.CalorieCount

    If you have a specific obstacle you are having trouble with, let me know and I will go on the hunt to find you a solution.

  16. Errands To-Do. I’d be lost without it.

  17. Hi,
    Thanks for these tips. Here’s the thing though, I have an android :-/
    Any thoughts on similar apps for that phone?
    What I have is not working very well.
    Thanks!
    Brett

  18. Thanks for these great resources! I know I need all the help I can get.

  19. I was feeling overwhelmed this morning so I downloaded Koi Pond…amazing!! Everyone should get it, ADHD or not! It’s so relaxing!

  20. I DO very much love Remember the Milk! :) A free and fun tool.

  21. I’d add “Remember the Milk” to that list as well for a To Do List. I use it religiously!

    http://www.rememberthemilk.com/

  22. Really impressive site.

Trackbacks

  1. […] *ADHDApps Tip: Don't overload yourself right away with all these apps. Just like with all things ADHD, you must strike your proper balance. Remembering: Evernote My overall goal is to further the ADHD community as a whole, so I have handpicked 6 apps that focus on a specific problem or hurdle that we face as ADHDers. Blog: 6 Super ADHD-friendly iPhone Apps For Adults With ADHD […]

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